Brescia, May 20, 2001

Mille Miglia - Scrutineering
The Scandal No.1
The Scandal No.2
Ferrari in Particular
Starring Maserati
The End Came Too Soon

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Piazza Vittoria
Brescia in motion
The Tomarelli website
Brunello & Auto Salon Singen
The Singen website
Ferrari 250 TR - Replica using '0716 identity
Ferrari 250 TR - Replica using '0716 identity
Ferrari 250 TR - Replica using '0758' identity
Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta "TdF" s/n 0707GT
Ferrari 250 Monza Pinin Farina Spyder s/n 0420M
Ferrari 750 Monza Scaglietti Spyder s/n 0530M
Maserati 450 S s/n 4502
Maserati Tipo 4 CS 1100 s/n 1123
Maserati 8 C-3000 s/n 3004
Maserati 300S s/n 3083
The End
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Mille Miglia - Scrutineering
The Mille Miglia 2001 started with the scrutineering of the cars in the Piazza della Vittoria all day on Thursday 17 May, with the best possible light shed on the biggest mobile museum exhibition – sunshine !

You have to wake up early if you want to have some undisturbed moments admiring all of these exciting cars because from 9:00 a.m. on, the Piazza della Vittoria is so full of people that you often can’t separate the cars from the crowd. It seems as if the number of spectators grows from year-to-year.

While the scrutineering was going on, one could also visit an exceptional model car exhibition of all Mille Miglia winning cars and tons of old Mille Miglia photos in the catacombs of Hotel Vittoria. Of course, you could also stop in at the Mille Miglia store and browse through the accessories such as T-shirts, books etc.

It seems that almost every year it has rained cats and dogs at the start, and this year was no exception. As the first Mille Miglia participants drove down the start ramp in the Viale Venezia in Brescia, a kind of monsoon storm rolled in during the evening and was responsible for the most appalling conditions I have ever seen for the starting ceremony. Looking at some of the participants’ faces, you could easily see that they were questioning if it was such a good idea to be there…

The Scandal No.1
Just weeks before the lights turned green for the Mille Miglia 2001, rumours had it that a Ferrari 250 TR replica would show up and try to pass the scrutineering under the pseudonym of chassis number ”0716 TR.”

A German TR-entry, published in the official participants list, surprised all Ferrari experts (excluding one ”License Plate” spotter) to start with. 0716 TR was given as the chassis number. 

0716 TR ? Yes, this special TR was offered at the 2000 Christie’s Monterey Auction but did not sell. Some claimed it was later sold to the Symbolic Motor Car Company in La Jolla, but the results of enquiries were that this deal was discussed only with Symbolic and 0716 definitely went back to its Italian owner, Federico Dubbini.

So, which TR was to be presented by Mr. Aurelio Tomarelli from Munich and Mr. Schmitt ? Thanks to the internet, a short search with google.com brought the result in the form of this ”beautiful” site, www.

Initially I couldn’t believe what I saw there! Three cars were (and still are…) offered on this site, and not the usual ones, only two 250 TR’s and one Mercedes Silver Arrow. Which one? Of course the one and only W 196 in private hands, chassis 00006. In addition to pictures from the original 0716 TR, one can view a bright red 1958 250 TR with a funny looking gearshift (which looks like a Ford Escort has lent its gearshift for this TR) and steering wheel, not to mention the warning-signal button on the dashboard. Also interesting was the center petrol cap in the rear deck…

Would they really show up at Piazza Vittoria and offend not only the whole Mille Miglia committee, but all visitors with this TR Replica ? Yes, I can confirm it. They tried but had no luck in the end…

When I saw the car waiting for scrutineering, I personally asked (who I believe was) Mr. Tomarelli, who runs two Italian restaurants in Munich, which chassis number his car has because I had never seen this one before. The answer came straight forward - 0- 7-1-6 ! What a shame, and what an affront to Mr. Dubbini and his car.

Examination of the Tomarelli TR with German historical registration number ”M-F-28 H” brought in three different numbers – none of them 0716 of course…

The ”Bitsa” engine came from a 250 GT PF Coupe, s/n 0989GT, and a 250 GT PF Cabriolet S.1, s/n 0801GT. The frame is stamped s/n 1393GT. 

The ”well-known” Autosalon Singen in Germany had recently offered this car as a ”250 TR-C.” Upon reading the description for this car you could believe that it was a real car, worth between $4,000,000 and $6,000,000….Take a drink, sit down and be prepared to have a serious laugh attack reading this site,  www.

The Scandal No.2
In total, three Ferrari 250 TRs were listed for this year’s Mille Miglia. Besides the above- mentioned fake purporting to be 0716 and Lucchini’s real 0730TR, a third one turned up with a Mr. zu Schaumburg-Lippe from Austria.

Listed as chassis number 0758TR, I thought this had to be Pietro Brigato’s car, but I immediately recognized the different nose from Brigato’s TR. Also there were some minor oddities though this TR looked much more like a real one. Asking is always free of charge and so I tried my best asking the person next to the car if this was the ex- Brigato TR. He denied it and said that this car was the only real 0758TR, which was never owned by Brigato, but he couldn’t tell me the name of the owner prior to him. More than interesting, I thought….

It turned out that this TR was a replica as well, with the engine stamped s/n 4617GT.

Both replicas were sent home by experienced scrutineer and Ferrari expert Jean Sage, confiscating at least the Tomarelli FIVA paperwork in the process. 

Ferrari in Particular
Forty-two Ferraris in total showed up this year. A lot of well-known cars can be seen in almost every running, i.e. the two Caggiati cars, the Roschmann Ferraris and others. But the Mille Miglia 2001 had its Ferrari highlights as well, such as the Ferrari 750 Monza, s/n 0530M, driven by Apostoli and Scalvenzi. 0530M must have been recently sold to Italy after being offered for a while in the United States by Stan Zagorski. Another extremely rare Monza with Pinin Farina spider bodywork was entered by Dick Waaijenberg. Powered by a 3.0 litre V12 engine, this is one of only three 250 Monzas ever made and for a long time owned by Dries van der Lof from the Netherlands.

My personal favourite this year was Mr. Fitzsimmons’ outstanding 250 GT LWB TdF berlinetta, s/n 0707GT, painted in its original colors, red with central yellow-black-yellow stripes. Michel Ringoir raced this TdF from new in many Belgian and French races like the Tour de France. He ran in the latter three times with 0707GT, each time without success.

Starring Maserati
A dark blue 450 S monster bared its teeth while waiting for scrutineering and attracted the biggest crowds. Hartmut Ibing’s car, s/n 4502, did not excel in its period race history, but recently Bernd Hahne won a Shell Historic Challenge Race at Spa in May 2001 with it. Though not a car with the best handling, Ibing started the Mille Miglia
but he decided to retire early on due to the heavy rain. It was sad, but certainly the wisest decision.

Two pre-war Maseratis started, an 8 C-3000, s/n 3004, and Martin Sucari’s 4 CS-1100, s/n 1123, who finished successfully in 29th position. Uncertain as of today is the heritage of Wilhem van Huystee’s 8 C-3000. Some claim that it’s made of 8 CM bits while others believe that it was originally the experimental-FWD-8C-2500. However, it’s regarded as a true Maserati and could also be seen at last year’s Monterey Maserati celebration, displayed in the Maserati tent.

Unsolved as well is the 150 S, s/n 1655 mystery. Svedbom/Egger drove a Maserati 150 S with s/n 1655. Another 1655 is with Bruce McCaw in the States looking completely different. Last but not least, William Hay from the UK claims to have a third 1655- variation…

Like Hartmut Ibing’s 450 S, chassis 1655 was sold new to Tony Parravano and gathered some success driven by Ken Miles in 1955. Later it was owned by Roberto and Terry Carrara and competed in the 1986 Mille Miglia retrospective, most likely the specific car Bruce McCaw owns today.

So who produced the other 1655’s and which is the genuine one?

The three different Maserati 300 S – chassis 3056, 3060 & 3069 – also showed three different states of condition. On the one hand, Hartmut Ibing’s was an immaculate example in contrast to Mr. Smith’s rough 3060 and, on the other hand, William Binnie’s modified 3069 sported a huge roll cage.

The fourth 300 S listed and at the same time the last 300 S ever produced – chassis 3083 – was entered like last year by Read/Ratazzi, freshly repaired from last year’s incident, where the left front wing was damaged.


The End Came Too Soon
Unfortunately, my personal Mille Miglia trip ended on Friday morning just before my trip to San Marino when my Jaguar couldn’t be ”persuaded” to start properly and I finally had to return by train. This is the reason why we can only present you scrutineering pictures this year. I’m sorry about this.

Sergio Sisti and Dario Bernini driving a Healey Silverstone were the overall winners. The best Ferrari result, was for the 225 S, 0152EL, driven by Gnutti/Savoldi to 12th position.


Bjoern Schmidt The Scandal No.1
Just weeks before the lights turned green for the Mille Miglia 2001, rumours had it that a Ferrari 250 TR replica would show up and try to pass the scrutineering under the pseudonym of chassis number ”0716 TR.”

A German TR-entry, published in the official participants list, surprised all Ferrari experts (excluding one ”License Plate” spotter) to start with. 0716 TR was given as the chassis number. 

0716 TR ? Yes, this special TR was offered at the 2000 Christie’s Monterey Auction but did not sell. Some claimed it was later sold to the Symbolic Motor Car Company in La Jolla, but the results of enquiries were that this deal was discussed only with Symbolic and 0716 definitely went back to its Italian owner, Federico Dubbini.

So, which TR was to be presented by Mr. Aurelio Tomarelli from Munich and Mr. Schmitt ? Thanks to the internet, a short search with google.com brought the result in the form of this ”beautiful” site, www.

Initially I couldn’t believe what I saw there! Three cars were (and still are…) offered on this site, and not the usual ones, only two 250 TR’s and one Mercedes Silver Arrow. Which one? Of course the one and only W 196 in private hands, chassis 00006. In addition to pictures from the original 0716 TR, one can view a bright red 1958 250 TR with a funny looking gearshift (which looks like a Ford Escort has lent its gearshift for this TR) and steering wheel, not to mention the warning-signal button on the dashboard. Also interesting was the center petrol cap in the rear deck…

Would they really show up at Piazza Vittoria and offend not only the whole Mille Miglia committee, but all visitors with this TR Replica ? Yes, I can confirm it. They tried but had no luck in the end…

When I saw the car waiting for scrutineering, I personally asked (who I believe was) Mr. Tomarelli, who runs two Italian restaurants in Munich, which chassis number his car has because I had never seen this one before. The answer came straight forward - 0- 7-1-6 ! What a shame, and what an affront to Mr. Dubbini and his car.

Examination of the Tomarelli TR with German historical registration number ”M-F-28 H” brought in three different numbers – none of them 0716 of course…

The ”Bitsa” engine came from a 250 GT PF Coupe, s/n 0989GT, and a 250 GT PF Cabriolet S.1, s/n 0801GT. The frame is stamped s/n 1393GT. 

The ”well-known” Autosalon Singen in Germany had recently offered this car as a ”250 TR-C.” Upon reading the description for this car you could believe that it was a real car, worth between $4,000,000 and $6,000,000….Take a drink, sit down and be prepared to have a serious laugh attack reading this site,  www.

The Scandal No.2
In total, three Ferrari 250 TRs were listed for this year’s Mille Miglia. Besides the above- mentioned fake purporting to be 0716 and Lucchini’s real 0730TR, a third one turned up with a Mr. zu Schaumburg-Lippe from Austria.

Listed as chassis number 0758TR, I thought this had to be Pietro Brigato’s car, but I immediately recognized the different nose from Brigato’s TR. Also there were some minor oddities though this TR looked much more like a real one. Asking is always free of charge and so I tried my best asking the person next to the car if this was the ex- Brigato TR. He denied it and said that this car was the only real 0758TR, which was never owned by Brigato, but he couldn’t tell me the name of the owner prior to him. More than interesting, I thought….

It turned out that this TR was a replica as well, with the engine stamped s/n 4617GT.

Both replicas were sent home by experienced scrutineer and Ferrari expert Jean Sage, confiscating at least the Tomarelli FIVA paperwork in the process. 

Ferrari in Particular
Forty-two Ferraris in total showed up this year. A lot of well-known cars can be seen in almost every running, i.e. the two Caggiati cars, the Roschmann Ferraris and others. But the Mille Miglia 2001 had its Ferrari highlights as well, such as the Ferrari 750 Monza, s/n 0530M, driven by Apostoli and Scalvenzi. 0530M must have been recently sold to Italy after being offered for a while in the United States by Stan Zagorski. Another extremely rare Monza with Pinin Farina spider bodywork was entered by Dick Waaijenberg. Powered by a 3.0 litre V12 engine, this is one of only three 250 Monzas ever made and for a long time owned by Dries van der Lof from the Netherlands.

My personal favourite this year was Mr. Fitzsimmons’ outstanding 250 GT LWB TdF berlinetta, s/n 0707GT, painted in its original colors, red with central yellow-black-yellow stripes. Michel Ringoir raced this TdF from new in many Belgian and French races like the Tour de France. He ran in the latter three times with 0707GT, each time without success.

Starring Maserati
A dark blue 450 S monster bared its teeth while waiting for scrutineering and attracted the biggest crowds. Hartmut Ibing’s car, s/n 4502, did not excel in its period race history, but recently Bernd Hahne won a Shell Historic Challenge Race at Spa in May 2001 with it. Though not a car with the best handling, Ibing started the Mille Miglia
but he decided to retire early on due to the heavy rain. It was sad, but certainly the wisest decision.

Two pre-war Maseratis started, an 8 C-3000, s/n 3004, and Martin Sucari’s 4 CS-1100, s/n 1123, who finished successfully in 29th position. Uncertain as of today is the heritage of Wilhem van Huystee’s 8 C-3000. Some claim that it’s made of 8 CM bits while others believe that it was originally the experimental-FWD-8C-2500. However, it’s regarded as a true Maserati and could also be seen at last year’s Monterey Maserati celebration, displayed in the Maserati tent.

Unsolved as well is the 150 S, s/n 1655 mystery. Svedbom/Egger drove a Maserati 150 S with s/n 1655. Another 1655 is with Bruce McCaw in the States looking completely different. Last but not least, William Hay from the UK claims to have a third 1655- variation…

Like Hartmut Ibing’s 450 S, chassis 1655 was sold new to Tony Parravano and gathered some success driven by Ken Miles in 1955. Later it was owned by Roberto and Terry Carrara and competed in the 1986 Mille Miglia retrospective, most likely the specific car Bruce McCaw owns today.

So who produced the other 1655’s and which is the genuine one?

The three different Maserati 300 S – chassis 3056, 3060 & 3069 – also showed three different states of condition. On the one hand, Hartmut Ibing’s was an immaculate example in contrast to Mr. Smith’s rough 3060 and, on the other hand, William Binnie’s modified 3069 sported a huge roll cage.

The fourth 300 S listed and at the same time the last 300 S ever produced – chassis 3083 – was entered like last year by Read/Ratazzi, freshly repaired from last year’s incident, where the left front wing was damaged.


The End Came Too Soon
Unfortunately, my personal Mille Miglia trip ended on Friday morning just before my trip to San Marino when my Jaguar couldn’t be ”persuaded” to start properly and I finally had to return by train. This is the reason why we can only present you scrutineering pictures this year. I’m sorry about this.

Sergio Sisti and Dario Bernini driving a Healey Silverstone were the overall winners. The best Ferrari result, was for the 225 S, 0152EL, driven by Gnutti/Savoldi to 12th position.


Bjoern Schmidt
The Scandal No.1
Just weeks before the lights turned green for the Mille Miglia 2001, rumours had it that a Ferrari 250 TR replica would show up and try to pass the scrutineering under the pseudonym of chassis number ”0716 TR.”

A German TR-entry, published in the official participants list, surprised all Ferrari experts (excluding one ”License Plate” spotter) to start with. 0716 TR was given as the chassis number. 

0716 TR ? Yes, this special TR was offered at the 2000 Christie’s Monterey Auction but did not sell. Some claimed it was later sold to the Symbolic Motor Car Company in La Jolla, but the results of enquiries were that this deal was discussed only with Symbolic and 0716 definitely went back to its Italian owner, Federico Dubbini.

So, which TR was to be presented by Mr. Aurelio Tomarelli from Munich and Mr. Schmitt ? Thanks to the internet, a short search with google.com brought the result in the form of this ”beautiful” site, www.

Initially I couldn’t believe what I saw there! Three cars were (and still are…) offered on this site, and not the usual ones, only two 250 TR’s and one Mercedes Silver Arrow. Which one? Of course the one and only W 196 in private hands, chassis 00006. In addition to pictures from the original 0716 TR, one can view a bright red 1958 250 TR with a funny looking gearshift (which looks like a Ford Escort has lent its gearshift for this TR) and steering wheel, not to mention the warning-signal button on the dashboard. Also interesting was the center petrol cap in the rear deck…

Would they really show up at Piazza Vittoria and offend not only the whole Mille Miglia committee, but all visitors with this TR Replica ? Yes, I can confirm it. They tried but had no luck in the end…

When I saw the car waiting for scrutineering, I personally asked (who I believe was) Mr. Tomarelli, who runs two Italian restaurants in Munich, which chassis number his car has because I had never seen this one before. The answer came straight forward - 0- 7-1-6 ! What a shame, and what an affront to Mr. Dubbini and his car.

Examination of the Tomarelli TR with German historical registration number ”M-F-28 H” brought in three different numbers – none of them 0716 of course…

The ”Bitsa” engine came from a 250 GT PF Coupe, s/n 0989GT, and a 250 GT PF Cabriolet S.1, s/n 0801GT. The frame is stamped s/n 1393GT. 

The ”well-known” Autosalon Singen in Germany had recently offered this car as a ”250 TR-C.” Upon reading the description for this car you could believe that it was a real car, worth between $4,000,000 and $6,000,000….Take a drink, sit down and be prepared to have a serious laugh attack reading this site,  www.

The Scandal No.2
In total, three Ferrari 250 TRs were listed for this year’s Mille Miglia. Besides the above- mentioned fake purporting to be 0716 and Lucchini’s real 0730TR, a third one turned up with a Mr. zu Schaumburg-Lippe from Austria.

Listed as chassis number 0758TR, I thought this had to be Pietro Brigato’s car, but I immediately recognized the different nose from Brigato’s TR. Also there were some minor oddities though this TR looked much more like a real one. Asking is always free of charge and so I tried my best asking the person next to the car if this was the ex- Brigato TR. He denied it and said that this car was the only real 0758TR, which was never owned by Brigato, but he couldn’t tell me the name of the owner prior to him. More than interesting, I thought….

It turned out that this TR was a replica as well, with the engine stamped s/n 4617GT.

Both replicas were sent home by experienced scrutineer and Ferrari expert Jean Sage, confiscating at least the Tomarelli FIVA paperwork in the process. 

Ferrari in Particular
Forty-two Ferraris in total showed up this year. A lot of well-known cars can be seen in almost every running, i.e. the two Caggiati cars, the Roschmann Ferraris and others. But the Mille Miglia 2001 had its Ferrari highlights as well, such as the Ferrari 750 Monza, s/n 0530M, driven by Apostoli and Scalvenzi. 0530M must have been recently sold to Italy after being offered for a while in the United States by Stan Zagorski. Another extremely rare Monza with Pinin Farina spider bodywork was entered by Dick Waaijenberg. Powered by a 3.0 litre V12 engine, this is one of only three 250 Monzas ever made and for a long time owned by Dries van der Lof from the Netherlands.

My personal favourite this year was Mr. Fitzsimmons’ outstanding 250 GT LWB TdF berlinetta, s/n 0707GT, painted in its original colors, red with central yellow-black-yellow stripes. Michel Ringoir raced this TdF from new in many Belgian and French races like the Tour de France. He ran in the latter three times with 0707GT, each time without success.

Starring Maserati
A dark blue 450 S monster bared its teeth while waiting for scrutineering and attracted the biggest crowds. Hartmut Ibing’s car, s/n 4502, did not excel in its period race history, but recently Bernd Hahne won a Shell Historic Challenge Race at Spa in May 2001 with it. Though not a car with the best handling, Ibing started the Mille Miglia
but he decided to retire early on due to the heavy rain. It was sad, but certainly the wisest decision.

Two pre-war Maseratis started, an 8 C-3000, s/n 3004, and Martin Sucari’s 4 CS-1100, s/n 1123, who finished successfully in 29th position. Uncertain as of today is the heritage of Wilhem van Huystee’s 8 C-3000. Some claim that it’s made of 8 CM bits while others believe that it was originally the experimental-FWD-8C-2500. However, it’s regarded as a true Maserati and could also be seen at last year’s Monterey Maserati celebration, displayed in the Maserati tent.

Unsolved as well is the 150 S, s/n 1655 mystery. Svedbom/Egger drove a Maserati 150 S with s/n 1655. Another 1655 is with Bruce McCaw in the States looking completely different. Last but not least, William Hay from the UK claims to have a third 1655- variation…

Like Hartmut Ibing’s 450 S, chassis 1655 was sold new to Tony Parravano and gathered some success driven by Ken Miles in 1955. Later it was owned by Roberto and Terry Carrara and competed in the 1986 Mille Miglia retrospective, most likely the specific car Bruce McCaw owns today.

So who produced the other 1655’s and which is the genuine one?

The three different Maserati 300 S – chassis 3056, 3060 & 3069 – also showed three different states of condition. On the one hand, Hartmut Ibing’s was an immaculate example in contrast to Mr. Smith’s rough 3060 and, on the other hand, William Binnie’s modified 3069 sported a huge roll cage.

The fourth 300 S listed and at the same time the last 300 S ever produced – chassis 3083 – was entered like last year by Read/Ratazzi, freshly repaired from last year’s incident, where the left front wing was damaged.


The End Came Too Soon
Unfortunately, my personal Mille Miglia trip ended on Friday morning just before my trip to San Marino when my Jaguar couldn’t be ”persuaded” to start properly and I finally had to return by train. This is the reason why we can only present you scrutineering pictures this year. I’m sorry about this.

Sergio Sisti and Dario Bernini driving a Healey Silverstone were the overall winners. The best Ferrari result, was for the 225 S, 0152EL, driven by Gnutti/Savoldi to 12th position.


Bjoern Schmidt