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Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) Gran Premio s/n 5005 - La P3 vince la maggior parte dei Gran Premi internazionali tra il 1932 e il 1935
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21.10.2012, 08:11:33 cet

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General information

Technical specification:
265hp 2,992cc dual overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine, twin Roots superchargers; live axle front suspension with semi-elliptical leaf springs, live axle rear suspension, twin torque tube drive to bevel gears with semi-elliptical leaf springs and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,650mm

History of development:
The Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) Monoposto was the first genuine single-seat racing car in Grand Prix racing. It was powered by an eight-cylinder engine built around two four-cylinder blocks, each fed by its own Roots supercharger. One of the engines major strengths was its low-speed torque. Power to the rear wheels was transmitted through twin driveshafts that allowed for the drivers seat to be placed lower in the chassis. The original leaf spring suspension was replaced in 1935 by an independent Dubonnet front suspension. The complete car weighed in at only 1,545 lbs. and were it not for its cast-iron block engine, it would have weighed considerably less.

Winning its first race out of the box, the P3 went on to win 5 more major races in 1932. With the two best drivers of the day, Tazio Nuvolari and Rudolf Caracciola racing them 1932 was a successful year. Some said that with a Vittorio Jano designed car and their two great drivers they should not expect anything less. Vittorio Jano joined Alfa Romeo in 1923 from FIAT where he had worked on the Type 405 Grand Prix engine. His first charge from Nicola Romeo was to design a competitive grand prix car. Designated the P2, it had an eight-cylinder engine of 1,987cc, dual overhead camshafts and a small Roots supercharger running at 1.33 times crankshaft speed. The small blower gave, according to Lawrence Pomeroy’s The Grand Prix Car, 0.7 atmospheres boost, and the engine produced 156hp at 5500 rpm. In its first racing appearance Giuseppe Campari’s P2 outran Europe’s best including Bugatti, Fiat, Delage, Miller and Sunbeam at the 503 mile 1924 European GP at Lyon and conclusively established Alfa Romeo’s sporting  reputation.

The P2 was a consistent grand prix winner through 1929. Its 1925 World Championship is the reason why every subsequent Alfa’s badge is surrounded by the laurel wreath of victory.

When the bar was raised for the 1931 season, Jano created two very different automobiles. One, the Tipo A, was powered by a pair of 6C 1750 engines mounted side-by-side and driving the rear wheels through a pair of transmissions, driveshafts and differentials into a single solid rear axle. The Tipo A was powerful, but its complication brought unreliability and its career was short. The other was an eight-cylinder based on the bore and stroke of his six-cylinder 1750. Intended for both sports and grand prix competition, Jano used two pairs of fourcylinder aluminum blocks with steel cylinder liners and detachable aluminum double overhead camshaft cylinder heads. The camshafts were driven by a helical gear train between the pair of blocks to minimize inertial loadings and torsional cam timing variations. With the 6C 1750’s 65x88mm bore and stroke the eight displaced 2,336cc. It breathed through a single Roots supercharger and dual throat Memini carburetor and produced 178hp at 5,400rpm. Designated 8C 2300, it earned the nickname it bears to this day, “Monza”, when 1924 Lyon winner, the stocky baritone Campari, teamed with the diminutive and mercurial Figlio del Diavolo, Tazio Nuvolari, to win the 10 hour 1931 Italian GP at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza.

While the 8C 2300 was eminently successful in the 1931 season, a new 750kg formula for 1932 convinced Alfa Romeo a new car was necessary.

Putting the complicated Tipo A behind him, Jano returned to proven principles for the 1932 Tipo B, designing his first purpose-built grand prix car around the demonstrated effectiveness of the Monza but with attention to detail and execution that made it Alfa’s greatest single seat grand prix car. The Tipo B retained the Monza’s layout but cast the cylinders and heads integrally in the fixed head, testa fissa, configuration that had proven successful with the 6C racers. The centrally located camshaft drive gear train used straight cut gears for more precise timing. Also driven from the center of the crankshaft were two small Roots superchargers, each with its own Weber carburetor and supplying four cylinders. Jano recognized that smaller superchargers put less stress on the engine, had less rotational inertia and were more thermally efficient. Crankcase and sump were cast in magnesium, one of Jano’s objectives being to reduce the engine’s weight. Initially displacing 2,654cc, it produced 180hp at 5600rpm with 0.75 atmospheres boost.

The Tipo B’s chassis was equally based on proven principles but conceived and executed with attention to road-holding and lightness. The chassis layout was conventional, with solid axles front and rear sprung by semi-elliptic leaf springs, however, great attention was paid to keeping all masses low and unsprung weight to a minimum. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the rear axle drive system. Drawing on the Tipo A’s split drive arrangement, Jano placed the differential at the back of the Tipo B’s transmission with two short driveshafts running at angles to simple bevel gears just inside each rear wheel driving stub axles. The axle tube itself was very light and the centrally located driver could sit low, between the two driveshafts.

Ferrari’s factory-entered Tipo Bs dominated grand prix racing in 1932. At the time Alfa consistently referred to these monopostos as Tipo B, but never objected to the public’s and journalists’ use of “P3”, a designation that could only remind competitors of the Alfa P2’s grand prix domination. It was the best kind of advertising hyperbole – that backed up with performance – and it is as the P3 that the Alfa Romeo Tipo B is best known through its long and successful history.

Race history in general:

1932:
The P3 quite literally obliterated its competition in the 1932 season, winning seemingly at will and frequently backed up by Monzas in GP configuration. Its first appearance came at the Italian GP at Monza on June 5. While in earlier years grands prix had been 10 hour races, along with other revised regulations the three Championship races, the Italian, French and German GPs, were held over a length of “only” five hours, a sprint race by the standards of the day. New and daunting cars were built for the 1932 formula by the major constructors. Maserati unleashed a 4,904cc twin-engined monster, the V5, powered by a pair of eightcylinder 26M engines which it entrusted to the great Luigi Fagioli. Bugatti countered with two supercharged 4,972cc Type 54s driven by Louis Chiron and Achille Varzi.

The Alfa Romeos were entered by Scuderia Ferrari, the private team supported by wealthy Italian sportsmen and managed by Enzo Ferrari that had been established in 1929 to campaign Alfa Romeos in grand prix and sports car competition. Two P3s were built by Alfa Romeo at Portello and prepared by Scuderia Ferrari for the Italian GP at Monza where they were driven by Tazio Nuvolari and Giuseppe Campari, backed up by four Monzas for Borzacchini, Caracciola, Ghersi and Siena. An epic battle ensued, one of the most stirring in an era of great races. First Nuvolari in the P3 and Chiron in the Bugatti swapped the lead. Shortly, however, they were surpassed by Fagioli in the twin-engined Maserati. After Chiron’s retirement Nuvolari and Fagioli engaged in a see-saw battle, the lightweight 2.9 liter P3 against the monster Maserati, until the day was carried by the incomparable Nuvolari in Jano’s lithe monoposto Alfa, repeating the P2’s accomplishment of achieving victory in its first competitive appearance.

Three Alfa Romeo P3s driven by Nuvolari, Caracciola and Borzacchini appeared at the French GP, the oldest and most prestigious race of the season, this year held at Rheims. They were opposed only by Bugatti which presented two Type 54’s for Varzi and Divo and a 2.3 liter Type 51 for Chiron. Ten privately-entered Alfas and Bugattis filled out the sixteen car field. At the end of the day the P3s swept the board with Nuvolari first, followed by Borzacchini and Caracciola. The third race of the 1932 Championship series, the German GP at the daunting Nürburgring likewise saw the P3s sweep the podium with Caracciola taking his home GP under team orders, leading Nuvolari and Borzacchini. The P3 captured a succession of other victories; during the whole 1932 season it was defeated only once when Nuvolari’s magneto was swamped in a rain- drenched Czechoslovakian GP at Brno on September 4 and repeated pit stops dropped the Flying Mantuan and his P3 to third at the finish.

1933:
Only six P3s were built by Alfa Romeo for the 1932 season and after the devastation they wreaked on the competition, Alfa, now in financial difficulty and nationalized as part of the Istituto Ricostruzione Industriale, officially withdrew from racing. The P3s were stored in Portello and Scuderia Ferrari competed with 8C Monzas increased in displacement to 2,632cc. They, however, were not competitive with the dedicated grand prix machines from Bugatti and Maserati and Enzo Ferrari finally pried the P3s out of the factory’s hands. Their first appearance was at the Coppa Acerbo on August 13. Luigi Fagioli in the P3 faced off against Nuvolari, now driving his own three liter Maserati, and once again the P3 was victorious. Fagioli also snatched victory in the Italian GP at Monza on September 10th but in the Monza GP Campari in the Alfa P3 was killed in an accident on the first lap of the second heat. The P3s took further victories, including Chiron’s wins in Czechoslovakia and Spain and Motor Sport’s unofficial tally of manufacturers’ points at the season’s end saw Alfa Romeo the decisive leader.

1934:
Following the 1933 season Alfa Romeo announced it would build a limited series of enhanced P3s with 2,905cc displacement making 255bhp at 5,400rpm. Initially slated for delivery to clients, Enzo Ferrari succeeded in convincing Alfa Romeo to restrict availability of the 1934 P3s only to Italian clients, effectively locking up the new P3s for Scuderia Ferrari. In addition to more power the 1934 P3s also had improved chassis with hydraulic brakes, hydraulic shock absorbers at the rear along with friction dampers and a wider cockpit to meet regulations, but at the cost of an increase in weight although still well under the 750kg maximum allowed by the GP rules. Eventually some nine of these 1934 Alfa Romeo P3s were built while the earlier P3s were updated to meet the 1934 regulations.

Ferrari entered five 2.9 liter P3s for the Monaco GP driven by Varzi, Chiron, Guy Moll, Lehoux and Count Trossi, Scuderia Ferrari’s President. Ranged against them were three of the new Type 59 Bugattis for Dreyfus, Wimille and Nuvolari and a selection of Maseratis. Intruding on the scene, but not an official entrant, was Caracciola who took demonstration laps in the newest Mercedes-Benz GP car, a hint of things to come in the increasingly nationalistic grand prix competition.

Count Trossi, whose position as the President of Scuderia Ferrari was not an honorary one, set the fastest practice time which gave him the pole position in the first grand prix in which the starting grid was set by time rather than by a drawing. Rene Dreyfus took the lead in his Type 59 Bugatti at the start but was quickly passed by Louis Chiron who drove with verve, building his lead lap after lap. He was eventually pursued by Phillipe Étancelin driving his year-old Maserati 8CM until a mid-race accident sidelined the charging Maserati. Nuvolari, also in a Bugatti Type 59, and Piero Taruffi in one of the Scuderia Ferrari Alfa P3s tussled mid-race until they encountered mechanical problems. Through it all the young Guy Moll, in his first race for Scuderia Ferrari, drove consistently and eventually rose through the pack to lie second behind the great Chiron.

Guy Moll was nearly two months shy of his 24th birthday when he took his first start as a member of Scuderia Ferrari. An Algerian, like fellow Scuderia Ferrari driver Marcel Lehoux, he had first risen to prominence two years before, driving Lehoux’s Bugatti to 3rd place in the Czechoslovakian Grand Prix. Moll acquired a 2.6 liter Alfa Romeo Monza in 1933 and showed a blend of consistency and quickness, which marked him as an up-and- coming driver. He was one of the private entrants who sent a deposit to Alfa Romeo for a customer P3 but unlike most of the disappointed privateers, when Alfa decided to restrict the P3s to Scuderia Ferrari Moll, along with his countryman and patron Lehoux were added to the team.

Showing fine balance between speed and reliability, Moll pursued the veteran Chiron, who had built his lead to nearly two minutes, almost a full lap, through the streets of Monaco. Then, on the penultimate lap of the 100 circuit race, Chiron miscalculated at the station hairpin and entangled his P3 in the sandbag barrier. It took him nearly three minutes to extricate the Alfa while Moll swept by and took the victory by just over a minute.

Dreyfus’s Bugatti interrupted a P3 train, finishing 3rd ahead of Lehoux, both a lap in arrears to Moll and Chiron.

The P3 swept the podium spots a total of four times in 1934 at Tripoli (Varzi, Moll, Chiron), Penya Rhin (Varzi, Chiron, Lehoux), the French GP (Chiron, Varzi and Count Trossi (with relief from Guy Moll)) and the GP de la Marne at Rheims (Chiron, Moll and Varzi/Marinoni). At Bordino the P3s were 1-2 (Varzi, Chiron) with Tadini 3rd in a 2.6 liter Monza. One of the more remarkable P3 wins came when Achille Varzi won the Targa Florio.

Guy Moll continued to run fast and carefully planned races, taking an important victory on the German teams’ home turf at the Avus-Rennen on the day before his 24th birthday in a special streamlined 3.2 liter Alfa Romeo P3. In the Coppa Ciano on July 22 Varzi and Moll battled throughout the 241 km event. The veteran Varzi eventually took the victory, but Moll’s talent and race-craft were now thoroughly evident.

At the Coppa Acerbo held on the 16 mile Pescara circuit on August 15 the German teams appeared in force with three of the eight-cylinder supercharged W25’s putting 350hp in the hands of Caracciola, Fagioli and champion motorcycle rider Ernst Jacob Henne and two 16-cylinder 295hp Auto Union Type A’s in the hands of Hans Stuck and Wilhelm Sebastian up against the 255hp Alfas. Their performance decisively showed where the rest of the season was headed, particularly the Mercedes team which were both fast and quick.

The race started on a wet track exploited by Caracciola who set a blistering pace. Stuck, Varzi and Fagioli (Auto Union, Alfa P3 and Mercedes respectively) battled for second until Caracciola was caught by a rain shower and crashed. Fagioli now led but had to pit for tires. The new leader? Guy Moll.

A fuel stop dropped Moll to third behind Varzi (who had taken over Pietro Ghersi’s Alfa P3) and Fagioli which became second when Varzi pitted for new tires. Running hard with only two laps of the 20-lap contest remaining, Moll came up to lap Henne in the Mercedes W25 on the Montesilvano straight. The Alfa twitched, some say blown off its course by the scirocco wind off the Adriatic Sea, spun off course, bounced through a ditch, hit a bridge and finally was arrested nearly a quarter mile away by the wall of a barn. Guy Moll, only twenty-four and the rising star of Scuderia Ferrari, died shortly thereafter.

A brilliant career was cut short, but not before accomplishing a feat – winning his first grand prix with a factory team – that few others have achieved. In Guy Moll’s case it came, further, at the age of only 23, in an era when experienced drivers enjoyed a distinct advantage. Guy Moll’s 1934 Monaco Grand Prix victory was an accomplishment that remained unmatched for well over a half-century – winning his first grand prix at the age of 23 years, 314 days.

The P3’s most famous victory came very late in its career when Tazio Nuvolari beat the combined German might of five Mercedes and four Auto Unions. That race, the German Grand Prix at the Nurburgring, in front of dozens of Nazi officials is considered one of Nuvolari’s greatest victories of all time while the car that took him to victory, the P3 is enshrined in the pantheon of great Grand Prix cars.


Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 s/n 5001
Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 s/n 5002
Alfa Romeo P3
1932 Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) Gran Premio s/n 5005 - La P3 vince la maggior parte dei Gran Premi internazionali tra il 1932 e il 1935
Alfa Romeo P3 Monoposto s/n 5006

Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) Register

Alfa Romeo P3 s/n 50005

Chassis overview

First series:

Chassis Last known owner


5001 (SF 33) Greg Whitten, Medina, Washington, USA
5002 (SF 38) Warren ‘Ned’ Spieker, Atherton, California, USA
5003 (SF 37) Willi Balz, Wolfschlugen, Germany
5004 Destroyed and written off
5005 Alfa Romeo Museo Storico, Arese, Italy
5006 (SF 33)   Peter Giddings, San Francisco, California, USA



Second Series:

Chassis Last known owner


50001 (SF 41) Carlos Monteverde, UK (up for sale via Symbolic/Talacrest in 2000)
50002 (SF 42) Hugh Taylor, UK
50003 (SF 43) Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan
50004 (SF 44) Willi Balz, Wolfschlugen, Germany
50005 (SF 45) Jon Shirley, Medina, Washington, USA
50006 (SF 46) Umberto Rossi, Italy
50007 (SF 47) Anthony Smith, UK
50008 Missing, chassis may be used to build the Bimotore (SF 48)
50009 (SF 49) Destroyed (Rodney Felton, UK used the “missing” number to build up a replica)



Detailed histories

1.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5001

1932

Completed, this is the only P3 with shorter wheelbase than the other P3s and is also the only

 

one with a ‘biposto’ sports car body


1932-33

Various GP races


1933

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy (SF 34)


1934

1st - GP Monaco, Guy Moll

1934

1st - Criterium di Roma, Piero Taruffi

1934

1st - Mille Miglia, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

dnf - Targa Florio, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

dnf - Tripoli GP, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

3rd - Sorrento-Sant’Agata, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

4th - Corsa del Kesselberg, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

3rd - Circuito di Torino, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

2nd OA 1st IC - Corsa del Grossglockner, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

4th OA 1st IC - Corsa dello Stelvio, Carlo Pintacuda

1934

3rd - Circuito di Lucca, Carlo Pintacuda

1936

4th - Mille Miglia, Clemente Biondetti


193.

Sold to South America


197.

Located in UK as a ‘bitsa’, rebuilt


198.

Owned by Alain de Cadenet, UK


19..

Registered on plates: “MFF 955”


198.

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


….

Sold to Greg Whitten, Medina, Washington, USA


2002/jan/23-27

Displayed at Cavallino Classic by Greg Whitten, won “Peoples choice Award”





2.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5002

1932

Completed, fitted with standard semi-elliptic front springs


1932

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

 

(SF 38)


1933

Entered in various GPs in Europe


1934/dec/24

Sold to Count Felice Trossi, Italy

and registered on plates: “VC 7687”


1935/apr/29

Sold to Carlo Gari, Genova, Switzerland

and registered on plates: “GE 19644”


1935

Most probably entered by Nando Barbieri in the following races:


1935/may/05

dnf - GP Tunis, Nando Barbieri

1935/may/12

dnf - GP Tripoli, Nando Barbieri

1935/may/26

6th - Avusrennen, Nando Barbieri (r#12)

1935/aug/25

dnf - GP Schweiz, Nando Barbieri

1935/sep/29

dnf - Coppa Edda Ciano (Lucca), Nando Barbieri


1936/feb/24

Sold to Maria Sardi, Genova, Switzerland

(wife of Franco Sardi)


1936

Sold back to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy


1936

Fitted with Dubonnet independent front supsension and hydraulic brakes


1936/jul/11

Sold to Hans Ruesch, Napoli, Italy

 

(also Switzerland)


1936/aug/15

5th OA - Coppa Acerbo, Hans Ruesch

1936/aug/23

1st OA - Prix de Bremgarten, Hans Ruesch

1936

Painted red and white


1937

Most probably entered by Renato Balestero in the following races:


1937/jun/13

dnf - Eifelrennen, Renato Balestero

1937/jul/25

dnf - GP Deutschland, Renato Balestero

1937/sep/26

dnf - GP Brno, Renato Balestero


1937/aug/21

2nd OA - Prix de Bremgarten, Curt Willy Futternecht (behind Ruesch in 50013)


1938

Sold to John Snow, Australia

for Jack Saywell


1938/apr/23

dns - Cork race, Buddy Featherstonhaugh

1939/jan/02

6th OA - GP Australia, Lobethal, Jack Saywell

1939/jan

Set various national Australian land speed records on Pipe Clay track by Jack Saywell


1939

Engine only sent back to Italy by ship, but the ship was torpedoed and so; original engine lost

forever!

194.

Sold to Rex Marshall, Australia - engineless

194.

4.3-litre Alvis engine fitted by Marshall


1952

Sold to Bill Murray, Australia


1952/apr/14

3rd OA - GP Australia, Bathurst, Bill Murray

1953/jan/26

dnf(engine) - Orange, Bill Murray

1954

134.4 mph over a quarter fyling mile, Orange, Bill Murray


1954

Sold to Gordon Greig, Australia


1955/easter

acc. - Bathurst, Tony Bourke - killing two spectators


1956

Sold to Ray Walmesley, Australia


1956

1st OA - Bathurst, Ray Walmesley

1956

GMC truck engine fitted by Walmesley

1957

1st OA - Bathurst 100, Ray Walmesley


1958

Fitted with Chevrolet Corvette V8-engine


196./early

Sold to Doug & John Jarvis, Adelaide, Australia


1966

Sold to Hon. Patrick Lindsay, UK


1966

Restored to pre-war configuration by Crosthwaite & Gardiner, UK

Fitted with engine 50001 (bought from Lord Ridley)


19..

Sold to Don Young, Santa Barbara, California, USA

via Keith Duly, Bethlehem, CT, USA


19..

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


2001/aug/19

Auctioned at Christie’s Pebble Beach Auction but remained unsold, highbid $ 1.4mio


2002/jan

Offered for sale by Bruce Trenery’s Fantasy Junction, Berkeley, California, USA,

asking $ 1.9mio


200.

Owned by Warren ‘Ned’ Spieker, Atherton, California, USA





3.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5003



1932

Completed


1933

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 37)


1935

Sold to Raymond Sommer, France

and raced by him in the mid-thirties. Later in 1935,

Sommer also bought one of the 1934 Tipo Bs (chassis 50004)

and campaigned both that year as a team.

Sommer’s Alfa Romeos were both painted in the French racing blue.


1936

Sold to W. C. Deveraux, UK

for Chris Stanilard to drive and the car was conducted with some success by him.

The Alfa Romeo remained in Sommer’s blue livery that year.



1937

At the end of the 1937 season, in which the P3 had only raced once

at the Campbell Trophy meet, it was decided to modify the Alfa considerably

for further work at Brooklands. The work was undertaken by J.S. Worters

and included a new 4-speed gearbox, a Lockheed hydraulic braking system with larger

drums, a stiffer frame, modified leaf spring suspension and an aerodynamic body.

The ‘Multi-Union’ Special was born.


1938/oct

Stanilard took a number of records at Brooklands,

including the Class D Flying-Start over distances of five kilometres (at 139.5mph),

five miles (at 139.9mph),

ten kilometres (at 139.6mph) and finally,

ten miles (138.9mph).

The ‘Multi-Union’ also set a new Lap Record for the Outer-Circuit (Class D)

at a very fast 141.45mph.


1938/late

At the end of the 1938 season, further work was undertaken on the car and the resultant

machine is often referred to as ‘Multi-Union II’. The front part of the chassis frame was

removed and the old rigid beam axle replaced by an Italian Tecnauto I.F.S. system and the

rest of the rear suspension was also altered to cope. The coachwork was altered once more

and ended up looking rather like a W125 Mercedes Benz.


1939

Stanilard had a couple of further outings at Brooklands during 1939

but with the outbreak of war, the career of the ‘Multi-Union’ came to a close and

it dropped out of sight for a number of years.


194.

Chris Stanilard was chief test pilot for Fairey Aviation, but was killed during WWII.


194.

Sold to Jack Emmott, UK


194.

Sold to Fry bros., UK


19.

Sold to G.F.Yates, UK


197./early

Sold to Hon. Patrick Lindsay, UK

who loaned it to the Donington Collection.


1977/apr

Entered in the 1977 VSCC Silverstone meet and since then sporadically campaigned

by Lindsay

1978

Sold to Chris Mann, London, UK

who similarly raced it.


1985

Chris Mann decided to resurrect the identity of the ex-Stanilard P3,

stripping the ‘Multi-Union’ of the genuine Alfa Romeo parts which remained on the Special.

Work on the P3 identity progressed slowly (the project lasted from 1985 until 1991)


Meanwhile, the remaining ‘Multi-Union’ parts were sold to the late David Black, UK

who planned to rebuild that identity as well.


19..

Registered on plates: “GP 37”


1992

Sold to Peter Groh, Gaertringen, Germany


1992/jul

Christie’s Historic Festival entered by Peter Groh in July.


1992-1996

Run both in GP and ‘Biposta’ configuration in historic events.


1996/early

Sold to Robert Fink, Munich, Germany

who paid PDS 1.0mio.


1996

Ferrari Historic Challenge, Ferrari Racing Days, Nuerburgring, Robert Fink

1997/jul

Ferrari Historic Challenge, Coys International Historic Festival, Robert Fink (r#12)

1997

Ferrari Historic Challenge, Tutte le Ferrari in Sicilia, Enna, Robert Fink

1998/apr

Ferrari Historic Challenge, Spa Ferrari Days, Robert Fink

1998

Ferrari Historic Challenge, Tutte le Ferrari in Pista, Imola, Robert Fink

1999/nov/05-07

Ferrari Maserati Historic Festival, Tutte le Ferrari a Vallelunga, Robert Fink (r#2)

2001/apr

Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, Spa Ferrari Days, Robert Fink (r#3)

2001/oct/19-21

Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, Tutte le Ferrari a Monza, Robert Fink (r#3)

2002/apr/26-28

Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, Spa Ferrari Days, Robert Fink (r#11)

2002/sep/07-09

Ferrari Racing Days Nuerburgring, Robert Fink (r#11)

2002/oct/16-18

Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, Tutte le Ferrari a Misano, Robert Fink (dns)

2006/mar

Displayed at Retro Classic, Stuttgart

2006/sep/01-03

Goodwood Revival Meeting, Robert Fink (r#2)

2007/oct/26-28

Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, Ferrari Finali Mondiali, Robert Fink (r#11)


2008

Sold to Willi Balz, Wolfschlugen, Germany





4.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5004


1932

Completed


1933

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF ??)


1934/aug/16

Fatal acc. - Coppa Acerbo, Pescara, Guy Moll


1934/aug/16

Car destroyed and written off





5.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5005


1932

Completed


19.. - 2009

Displayed in the Alfa Romeo Museo Storico, Arese, Italy





6.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 5006


1932

Completed


1933

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 33)


1932-34

Actively employed by Scuderia Ferrari throughout the 1932-1934 seasons,

and has been consistently described since just after World War II as the

“1934 Monaco Winner”, a conclusion supported by period photos of Guy Moll

at Monaco driving a P3 with features that are shared by 5006.


1935

Sold to Raphael Bethenod de Las Casas

who raced under the pseudonym “Georges Raph” with the advent of the fully

independent suspension Alfa Romeo 8C-35 in 1935


1935

2nd OA - GP France, Georges Raph

1935

7th OA - GP de la Marne, Georges Raph

1935

dnf(carbs) - GP Dieppe, Georges Raph

1935

2nd OA - GP Comminges, Georges Raph

1936

? - Pau, Georges Raph


194.

Sold to Anthony Powys-Lybbe, UK

who raced it with some success, winning the Wakefield Trophy at Curragh

outside Dublin in both 1949 and 1953 and taking the Frank O’Boyle Trophy

at Dundrod in Ulster in 1950.


195.

Sold to John Vessey, UK,

contesting VSCC events in 1955


19..

Sold to John Crowther, UK


19..

Sold to Michael Thackray, UK


1964

Sold to W.H. “Bill” Summers, UK

one of the preeminent early British collections who, with Peter Waller, raced it into the sixties.


1966

dnf(engine) - VSCC Seamon Trophy, Bill Summers


1966

Original engine replaced with another original P3 engine was fitted,

this one the rear engine from the Bimotore, a twin engine experimental grand prix car that –

while brutally fast – was too heavy and too hard on tires to find success on the racetrack.


1967

Sold to Neil Corner, UK,

lending it for display in the Donington Collection.


198./early

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


2000

Sold to unknown owner


2005/aug/20

Auctioned at RM’s Monterey Sports and Classic Car Auction and sold for $2,1mio incl. buyer’s

premium


2005/late

Sold to Peter Giddings, San Francisco, California, USA


Peter Giddings describes his car as such:


“#5006 is the sole surviving first series Tipo B, retaining its original

(subsequently factory widened) slim sided body and half elliptic rear suspension,

which is still being historic raced today.


#5006 is one out of only five Tipo Bs from a total of 13 survivors to have earned

Dennis Jenkinson’s  accolade of  “genuine”.


Scuderia Ferrari Tipo Bs (#5006 prominent amongst them) swept the board from the outset

with a stunning first (Tazio Nuvolari), second (Umberto Borzacchini),

and third (Rudolf Caracciola) at the 1932 French GP, averaging 90 mph.”




7.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50001


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 41)


1934

GP Dieppe, Lehoux


193.

Sold to Luis Fontes, UK

who was famed for his victory in the Monaco Grand Prix driving his Alfa Romeo

Monza a few years previously.


1937

Original engine installed in a racing hydroplane. Thereafter the car remained unused

and untouched throughout the war.


1955

Sold to George Weaver,

an American Air Force officer serving in Europe and enjoying club racing in sportscars

in England during his tour of duty. Mr. Weaver was the well known owner of the American

racing circuit of Thompson in Connecticut.


On his return to the USA he took this car and installed the engine from the

ex-Raymond Sommer car which remained in the States following the Vanderbilt Cup

race of 1937, numbered 50004. This engine has remained in the car ever since.


196./early

Sold to John Willock, USA

in the early 1960s who used the car very sparingly and later dismantled the P3

for a thorough overhaul but never completed the work.


198./early

Sold to Peter Giddings, San Francisco, California, USA,

still apart, who restored the car with the help of experts John de Boer and Phil Reilly.


1985/aug

3rd - Monterey Historic Races, Laguna Seca, Peter Giddings

1986/aug

2nd - Monterey Historic Races, Laguna Seca, Phil Reilly


198.

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


199.

Sold to Carlos Monteverde, UK (Brazil)


1997

Entered at Torrey Pines hillclimb

1999

Offered by Symbolic Motor Cars, La Jolla, California, USA, asking $3.5 mio.

1999/jun/19

Auctioned at Christie’s Petersen Automotive MuseumAuction and

sold for $ 2.202.500,00 incl. buyer’s premium


1999/jun/19

Sold to unknown owner




8.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50002


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 42)


1936

Sold to Count De Villapadierna, Spain


1939

Sold via Frank Griswold, San Francisco, California, USA


1939

15th OA - Indianapolis 500, Louis Tomei (r#58) (Griswold entrant)

1940

dnf - Indianapolis 500, Al Miller (r#58) (Griswold entrant)

1940

1st - World’s Fair New York, Frank Griswold


194.

Sold  to Tommy Lee, L.A., California, USA


1946/may/30

dnf - Indianapolis 500, Hal Cole (r#47) (Lee entrant) - “Don Lee Special”

1947

15th OA - Indianapolis 500, Ken Fowler (Lee entrant) - Don Lee Special”

1948

dnq - Indianapolis 500, Ken Fowler (Lee entrant) - “Don Lee Special”


195.

Sold to Bill Murray, Australia

in semi derelict condition


19..

Sold to David Uihlein Racing, Cedarburg, Wisconsin, USA

(still in semi derelict condition, this car is missing its proper engine,

transmission and rear axle)


200.

Sold to Hugh Taylor, UK


Note:


Some sources claim that the original chassis 50002 was re-numbered to “50007” (see

50007)





9.         Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50003


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 43)


1935

Sold to CEC Martin, UK


1948

Sold to Raphael Berthenod de las Casas, Paris, France

alias Georges Raph


1955

Sold to Lex Davison, Australia


1957

Sold to Steven Ames, Brisbane, Australia


1957

Sold to Rex Taylor, Australia


1959

Sold to Keith Blicaski, Toowoomba, Australia


1963

Sold to Lawrence Rofe, Melbourne, Australia


1967

Sold to Douglas and John Jarvis, Adelaide, Australia


1967

Sold to Sir Ralph Millais, Hawkhurst, UK


19..

Sold to Robert Cooper, Wiltshire, UK


1997

Sold to David and Ben Black, UK


1997

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


2004

Offered by Symbolic Motor Cars, La Jolla, California, USA, asking ??


2009/sep/18-20

4th - Goodwood Revival Meeting, Matt Grist (r#3)





10.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50004

1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 44)


1935

Sold to Tazio Nuvolari, Mantova, Italy


1936

Sold to France


1937

Sold to USA


19..

Fitted with Ford V8 engine (the original engine went in a hillclimb Special)


19.

Sold to Klaus Werner, Wuppertal, Germany


….

Sold to Thomas Bscher, Cologne, Germany


200.

Sold to Willi Balz, Wolfschlugen, Germany




11.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50005

1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 45)


1935

1st - GP Nurburgring, Tazio Nuvolari


1937

Sold to Austin Dobson, UK


19..

Sold to Kenneth Evans, UK


19..

Sold to Roy Salvadori, UK


 19..

Sold to Les Moore, UK


1951

Sold to A. J. ‘ Ron’ Roycroft, New Zealand


19..

Sold to Brian Tracey, New Zealand


 19..

Sold to Bill Clark, New Zealand


1989

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


2000

Sold to Jon Shirley, Medina, Washington, USA





12.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50006


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 46)


1937

Sold to Frank Ashby, UK - Duller & Ashby


194.

Sold to Ken Hutchison, UK

and races in sprints and hillclimbs


19..

Sold to James H. Goodhew, UK


19..

Sold to John McMillan, New Zealand


195.

Sold to Ernie Sprague, New Zealand


19..

Sold to Bill Harris, New Zealand


19..

Sold to Leon Witte, New Zealand


199.

Sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi, Japan


2000/mar/11

Auctioned at RM’s Amelia Island Auction and sold for $ 2.145.000,00 incl. buyer’s premium


200.

Sold to Umberto Rossi, Italy


2007/feb

Displayed at Retromobile, Paris, France (still owned by Rossi)





13.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50007


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 47)


1935

Sold to Richard ‘Dick’ Shuttleworth, UK


1935

Painted green to Shuttleworth’s order


1935

Shuttleworth broke Malcolm Campbell’s record at Brighton


19..

Registered on plates: “MPH 374”


1947

Modified into a two-seater sports car


19..

Sold to Geoffrey Barnard, Lyne, Surrey, UK


19..

Sold to Dennis Z. De Ferranti, Bofrenaun, Irland


19..

Sold to Bartlett, UK


19..

Sold to Henry W. Wessels III., Paoli, PA, USA


19..

Sold to Rodney Felton, UK


19..

Rebuilt back to P3 monoposto configuration


….

Sold to Anthony Smith, UK

(manager of the rock band ‘Genesis’)


2001

Offered for sale by Taylor & Crawley, UK


2009/sep/18-20

Goodwood Revival Meeting, Tony Smith (r#5)


Note:

Some sources claim that this car is 50002 which was re-numbered to "50007"

when sold to the UK in 1934/35. This theory is supported by the SF number "42"

that also appears on "50007". Engine 50002 was apparently re-numbered to "50003".





14.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50008

1934

Nothing is knonw about this car. Some sources claim that 50008 was supposed

to have laid in Bangladesh in the ‘60s (unconfirmed rumour)





15.      Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3) s/n 50009


1934

Completed


1934

Transferred to Scuderia Ferrari, Modena, Italy

(SF 49)


1935

Uprated to the latest specification with Dubonnet independent front suspension

and all usual modifications


1936

Nose modified to look like a Tipo C


1936

Sold to Riccardo Nasi, Argentina


1938/jan/03

1st OA - Circuito Mar del Plata, Riccardo Nasi

1938/may/14

2nd OA - Circuito de San Francisco, Riccardo Nasi


1948

Sold to Adriano Malusardi, Argentina


1949/feb/17

Fatal acc. - Circuito Mar del Plata, Adriano Malusardi


1949/feb/17

Destroyed by crash and fire, written off


19..

(Few) remains with Lucio M. Bollaert & Ernesto Pablo Dillon, Buenos Aires, Argentina


198./early

Remains sold to Rodney Felton, UK

who “reconstructed” 50009 into a Tipo B


1985/jun/08-09

VSCC Seaman Trophy, Oulton Park, Rodney Felton.

.

Dominant in historic racing in the mid-1980s and has kept racing on and off ever since.

Sometimes fitted with vestigal road equipment and registered as ‘HSV 977’.

Also active for owner Felton with Bugatti exponent Sir John Venebles-Llewellyn





 Bjoern Schmidt

Alfa Romeo Tipo B (P3), s/n 50007
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